Monday, April 13, 2009

student success and encouragement

This semester I have been tutoring some students at our elem. school. As I reflect back on each day's progress, I begin to wonder how much encouragement children receive at home. Considering the time and effort the teachers, aides, and volunteers invest in students on a daily basis, and the praise and encouragement we (should) give them, I wonder if this extra effort is rewarded at home...Which led me to an idea:
As I keep anecdotal records from each tutoring session, make a copy for the teacher (save one for me), I should have notes of encouragement ready to send home to the students whom I tutor...Is it safe to assume that students who receive extra help at school are working extra hard? Are they receiving any more praise at home for this work? It is my responsibility to give them that extra boost so that they will be inspired to keep working, and proud of their progress.
I would love some dialogue/feedback on this post! :)

3 comments:

lil' kk said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
lil' kk said...

I am not sure that the students who receive extra help are working extra hard. I do think the work is hard/difficult for them, so the student's own perception is that they are working hard to do the best they can. I like to think of a tutoring as a "learn to work smart session".

A tutor gives a close technical eye to the work habits of the student, analysis of misconceptions, and valuable feedback. A tutor helps a student create strategies specific to their needs, suggest tips for simplifying the task, and give assurance to students who might not have an adequate level of encouragement on the home front.

laylablue said...

thank you for your insight, and i am thrilled to have another follower.
i would have to agree with you that the tutored students may not be working extra hard. sometimes they are not putting forth enough effort, or the methods used in their regular classroom are not meeting their developmental or learning style needs...
facilitating a child's learning can be a daunting task, but always worth the effort.